March 2019 writing goals

So February was a little rough for me with writing and goals (as some might have noticed and my sister heard yesterday over drinks while we were hanging out in Chicago). This semester has been the first in a while when I actually had midterms and actually needed to study for them–and a month of wild weather left me exhausted (and has had me doing rounds with an upper respiratory bug). This said, March is a new month and I fully intend to do some catching up during said month, and as such some of the goals for the month will be adjusted accordingly.

The Breakdown:

This week:

  • Blurb When All’s Said and Done (original deadline was February 28 and I just did not get it done)
  • Brief write-up for untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn (I have locked down narration (third) and determined lead (both) but am not 100% certain on setting so I need to roll that around a little more an do a brief write up)
  • At least one chapter of Lost and Found (making up from the two I missed for February)

By March 15:

  • Storyboard and plot the untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn
  • Determine the supporting cast for the John and Tim UNSETIC yarn
  • Complete another chapter of Lost and Found

By March 30:

  • Develop main plot and subplots of the untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn
  • Figure out a title for the untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn
  • Blurb the untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn

By April 1:

  • Finish 5 chapters of Lost and Found during the month of March (this number includes the previous chapters indicated above)
  • Start the first draft of the untitled John and Tim UNSETIC yarn
  • Lock down scope, cast, and length of UNSETIC Files: Pawns
  • Finish outline for Epsilon: Redeemer
  • Blurb Epsilon: Redeemer
  • Remember to wish my mom and dad a happy 41st anniversary

This week I’ve treated myself to a little vacation in Chicago for a few days (thanks to my spring break from GVSU and a much-needed actual day off from work). Yesterday was spent hanging out with my sister followed by dinner with our brother and my sister’s boyfriend (who is just as awesome as my siblings and sister-in-law, which is pretty damn awesome), so Tuesday was a pretty full day. I anticipate today being a little more low-key and will be setting my own pace–which will likely involve a lot of coffee, maybe a few drinks, and a whole lot of writing if things go according to the mental plan I’m currently laying out for myself.

As always, thanks for reading and thanks for your support!

Prompt for July 18, 2014 – Day 199

Happy Friday!  I’m happy it’s Friday…

Two opening lines in a row might be lame, but I feel like they’re less lame if they’re ones I’m currently using myself.  Yesterday’s was from the current version of When All’s Said and Done.  Today’s is from the current draft of Epsilon: Redeemer.

Prompt Type: Opening Line

Prompt: “Go. Get out of here before they figure out what you did for me.”


Got an idea for a prompt?  Email me at emklitzke (at) gmail (dot) com.

Prompt for July 13, 2014 – Day 194

Aww, it’s Sunday already?  Bummer…

Fun fact: today’s opening line is actually the opening line from my first full-length novel, Epsilon: Broken Stars.

Prompt Type: Opening Line

Prompt:  “Identification.”


Got an idea for a prompt?  Email me at emklitzke (at) gmail (dot) com.

Prompt for January 25, 2014 – Day 25

Happy Saturday!

Today brings a new prompt type (a character–specifically, your antagonist/villain–development prompt) and this one’s got a little bit of a backstory.

When I wrote the original (and I mean the original original) draft of what became the main line of the Epsilon universe (the stories with Aaron Taylor and Caren Flannery), I had put together a really awful villain.  The only thing interesting about him was that he was Aaron Taylor’s father and Aaron hated him with every fiber of his being.  He was a cardboard cutout of a mustache-twirling villain you see in parodies and bad B-movies.  As I matured as a writer (and an individual), I got to thinking: how the hell did Aaron Taylor’s sweet, loving mother end up having her son with a man that turned out to be some kind of monster by the end of my original story?  The more I thought about it, the deeper I had to climb into Daniel Taylor’s head–and the more I learned about my “villain.”  As it turns out, everything Daniel does is motivated by love.

I had a similar arc in developing the Drilin Imperium for the same universe.  The more I explored their history and development and moved away from the simple “evil empire” concept, the more I began to realize what motivated the people at the very highest levels of power and the deepest levels of conspiracy inside of what used to be the Earth Federation.  E-Fed was transformed from a Federation of worlds to a shell of its former self because of simple fear.

These types of thought processes bring me to today’s prompt, which is designed to help you develop your antagonists/villains for your own novels and stories.

 

Prompt Type: Character Development

Prompt:  Think about your antagonist/villain and what motivates them.  Boil it down to one vice or virtue–love, greed, envy, fear, hope, etc.–that drives what they do.

Now change it up.  How would your villain be different if love motivated them?  Write a character sketch or scene detailing how love motivates the actions of your antagonist/villain.


Got a suggestion for a prompt? Contact Erin at emklitzke (at) gmail (dot) com.

Epsilon Universe extra – Wil and Ren

Epsilon: War Stories coverFor NaNoWriMo 2013, I started working on a collection of stories and scenes out of the Epsilon Universe entitled Epsilon: War Stories.  In the midst of working on this project, I ended up writing some scenes that take place during the same period as Epsilon: Redeemer that might never make it into anything else.

The following scene is from Ren’s point of view, and it’s a pivotal point in the evolution of her relationship with Wil after the events of Epsilon: Broken Stars, so if you don’t want spoilers of any flavor for Broken Stars or Redeemer, don’t click below the break.

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Snippet Sunday: Epsilon Broken Stars

This week’s snip is from Epsilon: Broken Stars–a bit of prose in which Aaron Taylor thinks of his beloved mother, Madeline, dead for several years by the time the story begins.Broken Stars cover - take two

In a universe where the fate of free worlds hangs in the balance, can one man make a difference?

The Resistance is a thin line of defense for the free planets of the Borderworlds.  The strip of former colonies forms a shrinking boundary between the Earth-controlled Drilin Imperium and the Epsilon Alliance, superpowers locked in a cold war a hundred years old.  It’s a no-man’s land home to billions living under the constant threat of Imperium invasion, a place where the Alliance dares not intercede for fear of sparking all-out war.

Aaron Taylor knows what’s at stake when he volunteers to join the Resistance.  The son of an Imperium general, the Alliance-trained military spy’s existence can be officially disavowed at a moment’s notice.  It’s work that’s already cost him everything he holds dear–including his beloved partner of seven years.

He joins the Resistance as a man with nothing left to lose at a time when the Resistance needs men like him the most.  It’s far from the disorganized rabble both the Alliance and the Imperium think it is, but without more able hands, the Borderworlds are doomed.  Soon, he begins to believe as they do–that there’s no hope for humanity without the men and women willing to fight and die for their homes on the border.

Torn between duty to both, when the chips are down, which will Taylor choose: the Alliance that made him, or the Resistance that made him its own?

Snippet below the break.


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